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COUNCIL ROAD BLOG

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    What Does the Nail Mean to Me?

    I am forgiven.
    I am loved.
    I am free.
    I am His.
    Please join us for Easter services on March 27 at 9, 10:15 or 11:30. - Trish Hedrick, Preschool Director



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    What Does the Nail Mean to Me?

    Because of God’s love, Christ died for us, the just for the unjust. Anyone who believes that they fully comprehend God’s love for the lost does not realize how high Christ was, how horrible our sins, and how low He allowed Himself to be brought to purchase us. We will spend eternity exploring that love. Join me for Easter services on March 27 at 9, 10:15 or 11:30. - Trent Young, Maintenance Team



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    What Does the Nail Mean to Me?

    When I consider the nail that was hammered into Jesus' body, I am reminded of the pain.The excruciating and horrible pain He felt physically was beyond what I have had to endure.The most agonizing pain was the pain of that nail multiplied by every sin I have committed along with every sin ever committed by every person that has ever lived and will live.Wow!The nail He received had explosive pain upon impact.Please join me for Easter service on March 27 at 9, 10:15 or 11:30 a.m. - Tracey Jines, Daycare Director



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    What Does the Nail Mean to Me?

    The nail is a reminder of His sacrifice for me. His suffering has brought me life and a reason to live! Please join us for Easter services on March 27 at 9, 10:15 or 11:30. - Timothy Davidson, AVL Engineer



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    What Does the Nail Mean to Me?

    The nail represents the pain and suffering of Jesus for us and the hate by the Romans toward Jesus. It means the everlasting love of Jesus toward us. Join me for Easter services on March 27 at 9, 10:15 or 11:30. - Terry Burr, Maintenance Team

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    What Does the Nail Mean to Me?

    The nail reminds me of the pain of the worst thing that ever happened which turned out to be the best thing that ever happened. Please join us for Easter services on March 27 at 9, 10:15 or 11:30. - Teresa Leming, Spiritual Formation Team Coordinator



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    What Does the Nail Mean to Me?

    The nail reminds me of how much Christ loved me and that he was willing to be nailed to the cross. - Susan Roberts, Food Service Director



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    What Does the Nail Mean to Me?

    I hold back tears when I think of the nail – the nail that was used in the sacrifice of His Son to cover my sins; a sacrifice I did not deserve. The nail brought forgiveness and eternal life for me. Please join us for Easter services on March 27 at 9, 10:15 or 11:30. - Susan Manning, Controller



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    What Does the Nail Mean to Me?

    1.       All that thrills my soul is Jesus, He is more than life to me. Thank you Jesus for the price you paid so that I may live forever with you. Join me for Easter services on March 27 at 9, 10:15 or 11:30.

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    What Does the Nail Mean to Me?

    The cross means I am free and all my sins are forgiven, past and present.God sent His only son so that I may have eternal life through him, Jesus Christ.Because of the cross, I have a choice and I choose Jesus. -Sherri Avants, CRBC Daycare-School Age Coordinator



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    What Does the Nail Mean to Me?

    The nails in Christ’s body remind me that He also sees and knows my suffering and pain and is never more than a heartbeat away as He cares for me. Seeing my pulse beat in the Lord’s Supper cup as I hold it is a vivid reminder of His blood that was shed for me. Join me for Easter services on March 27 at 9, 10:15 or 11:30 a.m. - Sarah Sutton, Pastor's Assistant and Communications Editor



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    What Does the Nail Mean to Me?

    1.       The nail reminds me of sacrificial love. Jesus painfully, yet willing, gave up his life to pay the punishment for my sins. Only a deep, selfless, and sacrificial love would compel the one who knew no sin to become the way for me (and you) to be reconciled to God. Please join me for Easter services on March 27 at 9, 10:15 or 11:30. - Sarah Johnson, Children's Minister

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    What Does the Nail Mean to Me?

    The nail and the cross are a constant reminder that I am forgiven.Christ died for me and my sins.He knows me better than I know myself.He knows my past, present and future, and continues to love me through it all.Because of His sacrifice and love for me, I know I have a hope and a future in Him. -Samantha Dempsey, CRBC Daycare Assistant Director



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    What Does the Nail Mean to Me?

    1.       We gave a nail to those that came to Ash Wednesday four or five years ago. Since that service, I have kept that nail, and it is the first thing that goes into my pocket each morning before I leave for work. I do this to remind me of His sacrifice and my obedience to Him each day that He gives me. It starts my day with Jesus and His love for me. Please join me for Easter services on March 27 at 9:00, 10:15 or 11:30. - Norman Behymer, Executive Pastor of Strategic Planning and Worship

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    What Does the Nail Mean to Me?

    The nail this Lent season represents the cross of Christ and therefore two profoundly different realities simultaneously. In the first place, it means that our sin was so devastating on a cosmic level that it required the cosmic sacrifice of Jesus; and in the second place that God's love for us was so immense He was willing to ascend to the death on a Roman cross. He paid a debt He did not owe because we owed a debt we could not pay. - Rick Thompson, Senior Pastor



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    What Does the Nail Mean to Me?

    1.       The nail reminds me of how Jesus willingly went to the cross although fully aware of the physical and spiritual pain He would suffer. He endured for the joy set before Him, the salvation of all who would believe. Even me. Please join us for Easter services on March 27 at 9, 10:15 or 11:30. - Micah White, Groups Pastor

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    What Does the Nail Mean to Me?

    1.       The nail to me means perfect love - a kind of love that reveals God's unwillingness to leave us in our sin as well as his willingness to take upon himself our deserved judgment. God's perfect love is shown in the nail.  Please join us for Easter services on March 27 at 9, 10:15 or 11:30. - Matt McLain, Middle School Pastor

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    What Does the Nail Mean to Me?

    "But this I know with all my heart, his wounds have paid my ransom." This nail represents God's ultimate expression of His love for us and what it took for us to be made alive in Christ. It represents sacrifice, pain, forgiveness of sins, salvation. It represents more than I can ever comprehend - words do not suffice.Please join me for Easter services on March 27at 9,10:15or11:30. - Makenzie Magnus,Community Partnerships Coordinator



     

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    What Does the Nail Mean to Me?

    This nail reminds me of God's great love for me. His love for us is so great that Christ freely gave His life for me and for you.Because of that great sacrifice, I get the opportunity to live for Him!I would love for you to join me for Easter services on March 27 at 9, 10:15 or 11:30. - Mark Lyle, Facilities Director



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    What Does the Nail Mean to Me?

    He paid my ransom. John 3:16: For God so loved the world that He gave His only begotten Son, that whosever believes in Him shall not perish but have eternal life. Please join us for Easter services on March 27 at 9, 10:15 or 11:30. - Lois Davis, Receptionist



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    What Does the Nail Mean to Me?

    The nail reminds me that there was a high price paid for my lowest moments. It shows me that despite His perfection and innocence, He went to the cross so that I could see the beauty of His glory and grace and find joy and worth in His name.Please join me for Easter services on March 27 at 9, 10:15 or 11:30. - Landry Franks, High School Pastor



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    What Does the Nail Mean to Me?

    The nail means God's eternal love and sacrifice, He has forgiven me of my sins.-Brenda Grigsby, CRBC Daycare Cook



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    What Does the Nail Mean to Me?

    I am imperfect and make mistakes every day. I deserve the nails. I have been spared by the love of a Savior. Please join me for Easter services on March 27at 9,10:15or11:30. - John Jensen



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    What Does the Nail Mean to Me?

    The nails that were nailed into the wrist of Jesus Christ meant that Jesus was willing to be crucified so that all, through Him, might be saved. It was the perfect sacrifice that God accepted in payment for our sins. - Jim Cary, Truck Stop and Benevolence Minister



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    What Does the Nail Mean to Me?

    The nail reminds me that Jesus not only died for me but He also suffered for me. The shed blood of Christ covers ALL my sin. Please join us for Easter services on March 27 at 9, 10:15 or 11:30. - Jason Arnold, Executive Pastor, Inside the Walls Ministries



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    What Does the Nail Mean to Me?

    The nail means that what was driven into Jesus' hand is sin; sin that no matter how hard I try to wash it away with doing good things, it is still as cold and hard and driven as it began. It is sin so poignant that as it was plunged into Jesus' hand, it began a stream of crimson blood that stained my life with a banner of white. Christ took the nail and sacrificed his life so I could be cleansed as white as snow. Please join me for Easter services on March 27 at 9, 10:15 or 11:30 a.m. - Hester Fulton, Arts Team Coordinator



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    What Does the Nail Mean to Me?

    The nail means Jesus suffered for me and went through excruciating pain for me. It means that Jesus shed His blood for my salvation. Please join me for Easter services on March 27 at 9, 10:15 and 11:30. - Guy Snyder, Maintenance Team



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    What Does the Nail Mean to Me?

    The nail is a personal reminder that my sin was the hammer that drove the nail through the Lord of all Creation, and He is the Savior of my soul. Please join us for Easter services on March 27 at 9, 10:15 or 11:30. - Eric Cornelius, Maintenance Team



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    What Does the Nail Mean to Me?

    The nail represents sacrifice and salvation. Praise the Lord and thank you, Jesus, who gave so much for me. Please joinus for Easter services on March 27 at 9, 10:15 or 11:30. - Doug Duncan, Remodeling and Maintenance Team



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    What Does the Nail Mean to Me?

    Nothing is more loving than the nail.It shows the love and forgiveness that Christ offers me.The nail scarred hand offers me eternal life. Please join me for Easter services on March 27at 9,10:15or11:30. - Dondra Lonsdale, Children's Ministry Coordinator



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    What Does the Nail Mean to Me?

    When I think of the nail, I am overwhelmed with a sense of love. I am humbled to think that Jesus was willing to be tortured on my behalf. My sin separated me from God, and the nail made a restored relationship with Him possible. Please join me for Easter services on March 27at 9,10:15or11:30. - Dann Ragan, Senior Adult and Missions Pastor



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    What Does the Nail Mean to Me?

    1.       El significado de La Cruz para mi: Es el Simbolo de la profundidad del amor de Dios por la humanidad. - Cristobal Lopez, Hispanic Pastor

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    What Does the Nail Mean to Me?

    Love. As a new father I am in constant awe of my daughter. Even at night I wonder if she's ok and breathing. The fact that God the Father turned his face away from His Son Jesus so that I could be saved and set free of my sin is an act that can only be described as love. The nails remind me of what Jesus went through and what God the father allowed out of love for me. This causes great humility and reflection as I think and live through the Lent Season. To hear the other part of what Christ has done for us, join me on March 27 at 9, 10:15 or 11:30 at Council Road Baptist Church. - Cody Dunbar, Arts Team Leader



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    What Does the Nail Mean to Me?

    1.       This nail reminds me of my Savior Jesus Christ that took my guilt, my sin, and my punishment and nailed it to the cross! Paul said it like this, “For I decided that while I was with you I would forget everything except Jesus Christ, the one who was crucified” 1 Corinthians 2:2.  Please join me for Easter services on March 27 at 9, 10:15 or 11:30. - Clint Chamberlain, Executive Pastor, Outside the Walls Ministries

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    What Does the Nail Mean to Me?

    The nail means no more pain and no more suffering. The nail means God sacrificed his Son for you and me. The nail is a constant reminder that sin no longer has its grip on our lives. The nail is a constant reminder of the cross, and the cross is a constant reminder of the punishment that we should have had to suffer. Instead, Jesus stretched out His arms and suffered for us. That’s what the nail means to me. Please join me for Easter services on March 27 at 9, 10:15 or 11:30 a.m. - Chris Allen, Cube Sports Director



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    What Does the Nail Mean to Me?

    1.       The nail represents the pain that Jesus suffered for me. Please join us for Easter services on March 27 at 9, 10:15 or 11:30. - Charlie Wright, Maintenance Team

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    What Does the Nail Mean to Me?

    The nail represents to me that Christ endured all the pain and suffering for my sin. There is no condemnation when I seek His forgiveness since He has paid the price. I can be my own worst critic, but God reminds me daily that goodness and mercy will follow me all the days of my life as I trust Him to mark my path.Please join me for Easter services on March 27at 9:00,10:15or11:30. - Carisa Wilsie, Karis Adoption and Orphan Director



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    What Does the Nail Mean to Me?

    1.       Our old way of life was nailed to the cross with Christ, a decisive end to that sin-miserable life - no longer at sin’s beck and call! Please join us for Easter services on March 27 at 9, 10:15 or 11:30. - Brad Mardis, Communications Director, Graphic Artist

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    What Does the Nail Mean to Me?

    1.       When I look at the nail, I think of God’s unconditional and continual love for me. No matter what I’ve done, He doesn’t look at me any differently or love me any less than He did the day before. He always loves me...He always cherishes me…He always treasures me. Because of that, my identity is in Him and in nothing on this earth. - Beth Dempsey, Production Arts Director

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    What Does the Nail Mean to Me?

    What Does the Nail Mean to Me?

    C - Christ's Death, R- Restoration and Reconciliation, O - Opportunity to share with others what Christ did for us, S - Salvation that it brings, S - Sons and Daughters is what He makes us become. The cross reminds me of my brokenness, the cost of my sins, and the price that was paid. It also reminds me of restoration and reconciliation that we have in Him!Please joinus for Easter services on March 27 at 9, 10:15 or 11:30. - Ali Hunt, Community Outreach Coordinator

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    Feasting on God's Word

    By Vickey Banks
    CRBC Author & Bible Teacher

    Your words were found, and I ate them, And Your word was to me the joy and rejoicing of my heart; For I am called by Your name, O Lord God of hosts. – Jeremiah 15:16

    The prophet Jeremiah knew a good feast when he ate one.

    I love the visual picture Jeremiah’s words painted when he said to God, “Your words were found, and I ate them” (Jeremiah 15:16). The original word he used for “ate” doesn’t mean he merely nibbled or tasted God’s Word, it means he devoured or consumed it like it was food for a hungry man.

    Are you hungry for God’s Word?

    I was a freshman at The University of Oklahoma when two senior girls approached me. Looking for a dorm room to lead a Bible Study in, they asked if I’d like to offer mine.

    What those girls couldn’t have known was that I’d spent years intimidated by virtually everything about the Bible and by everyone who seemed to know anything about it. I was heavily convicted that I should be reading the Bible, but doing so seemed boring, unrelatable, or simply made my head spin - the confusing names and formal language from a time so long ago, places I didn’t know and stories I couldn’t remember. I felt sure I was missing out on something good, and I longed to better understand the Bible, but I was too self-conscious about my lack of knowledge to ask anyone for help. And these girls were offering to come to my little dorm room and teach me!

    Aside from salvation, sitting cross-legged on my dorm room floor and learning to study God’s Word is the greatest gift I’ve ever been given. It has positively impacted every single area of my life. This was not a gift I could keep to myself. Within a year, I went from not having a clue as to how to study the Bible to actually helping others do so. I have found that when I come to God’s Word really truly hungry to hear Him, He has generously given me much to chew on. I have found more purpose, hope, comfort, instruction, correction, love, forgiveness, grace, mercy and encouragement than my heart has at times felt it could hold.

    Council Road is offering a feast of new Bible Study options this next week, and you’re invited!
    There are daytime and evening options, men’s groups, women’s groups, and co-ed groups. They’ll teach you how to resolve conflict, overcome addictions, do spiritual battle and get more from your personal Bible Study, as well as how to feed yourself and others from God’s Word.

    Check out and choose one of our Bible Study options at www.councilroad.org and join us at the feast. But to savor every bit of sweet, savory and spicy flavor God is offering…come hungry and be ready to devour His words for you!




     

  • Highly Fed

    This Sunday I will be teaching out of one of the most unusual books in the entire Bible.  What makes the eighth century BC prophet Hosea so unusual is that God used the tragic circumstances of his personal life to teach Israel a lesson about their unfaithfulness.  The book opens by explaining that Hosea's wife was unfaithful to him even to the extent that she became a prostitute.  The prophet proclaimed that his own personal tragedy paralleled the disobedience and unfaithfulness of God's people.  Although it was written eight centuries before the time of Jesus, the book is surprisingly relevant to us moderns.  For instance, think of the circumstances surrounding Israel and Judah during the time of Hosea:

    • Their relative prosperity resulted in a kind of ambivalence to biblical faith.
    • As they embraced neighboring cultures and engaged in economic trade their sense of identity in traditional moral values gave way to foreign influences. 
    • Those foreign influences led to religious syncretism and acceptance of many different forms of religious expression as being equally valid to biblical faith. 
    God used Hosea to awaken His people to the perilous situation they were facing.  The prophet warned them that just like his prostitute wife, they had left their true love in favor of substitute gods who would bring them only heartache and decline.  Aside from some of the obvious cultural parallels to our own culture, there are some great personal applications here.

    A couple of things stand out to me as I read Hosea. 

    First, the word used to describe the unfaithfulness of Gomer (Hosea's wife) in the original language is packed with meaning.   It is the word "zanah" in Hebrew.  The word is often translated as "prostitute" or  "whore" or "whoring" in the Bible and almost always refers to promiscuous behavior.   

    Of course the obvious implication is that just as a spouse feels intense personal betrayal and dismay because of marital unfaithfulness, so God is heartbroken over our rebellion against him.   It says something very profound to us about God's love for us.  But it also says something very interesting to us about the nature of our sin.

    Second, what makes this word particularly interesting is it's root meaning.  At it's root the word means "highly fed".  

    How is it that a word that originally meant "highly fed" could come to mean adulterous or promiscuous behavior?  The only plausible explanation is that the core of our sinful nature is our inability to say no to our own appetites.   Our problem isn't so much bad desire for evil things as it is over desire for good things. 

    Contained within the root meaning of this word that is used to warn Israel of their unfaithfulness are many important principles that are helpful:
    • Our biggest problem is our tendency to find satisfaction and meaning outside of His love and purpose. 
    • Always getting what we want is not necessarily the best thing for our soul.  Just like never hearing the word "no" spoils a child, lack of discipline leads to a corrupt spirit.
    • The more we believe we can satisfy the longings of our heart on our own, the less likely we are to depend on God's grace.  Highly fed people do not hunger for righteousness.  The most difficult people to reach with the gospel are the ones who believe they can get along just fine without God.  The only way to truly find life is to deny self.  
  • Jesus is the New and Better Temple

    Jesus is the New and Better TempleNext Sunday we are celebrating Palm Sunday and will study together the events surrounding the triumphal entry of Jesus into Jerusalem. I've been thinking this week about His intentionality as He approached the holy city. He deliberately set his face toward Jerusalem knowing He would die there. In fact, there are hints the disciples understood the incredible danger Jesus was putting himself in as they journeyed toward Bethany near Jerusalem in the weeks leading up to crucifixion. Jesus was a marked man at this time. The religious and political leaders in power had already begun to plot how they would kill him. It was Thomas who voiced what all the disciples must have been thinking as Jesus announced they were traveling to Bethany:

    So Thomas (also known as Didymus) said to the rest of the disciples, "Let us also go, that we might die with him." (John 11:16)And yet Jesus was not just going to Jerusalem as a stop along the way. He seems to have a specific objective that centers on the temple. His purpose there is revealed in the text we will be studying this Sunday.

    When Jesus entered the temple courts, he began to drive out those who were selling.“It is written,” he said to them, ‘My house will be a house of prayer’; but you have made it ‘a den of robbers.’” Every day he was teaching at the temple. But the chief priests, the teachers of the law and the leaders among the people were trying to kill him.Yet they could not find any way to do it, because all the people hung on his words. (John 19:45-48)
    What are we to make of the fact that Jesus intentionally went to the temple and began stirring things up at a time when people were seeking him out to kill him? Wouldn't it have made more sense for Jesus to lay low and stay out of the way until the controversy surrounding him died down and the danger had past? Did Jesus have a death wish? Was Jesus going to Jerusalem just so He could be crucified or was there a deeper meaning to his journey there?

    I think the answer is that Jesus is making the point to us that the meaning of the temple finds fulfillment in His redemptive work. Notice that Jesus moves into the temple courts and starts rearranging the furniture.

    He is proclaiming His authority over the place.

    Remember that He had done it once before at the beginning of His ministry in John 2. In that event He told the onlookers "Destroy this temple and in 3 days I will raise it again." (John 2:19) This statement is a direct foreshadowing of his death and resurrection and a direct correlation of that event fulfilling the meaning of temple.

    The work of Jesus fulfills the temple in the following ways:

    1. The temple embodies the presence of God. John 1:14 tells us that in Jesus we have "God's dwelling" among us. The literal translation of dwelling is "tabernacle". God's incarnation has now come to us in full fruition with the coming of Jesus. As long as the tabernacle stood, it was reminder that the messiah had not yet come.

    2. Through Christ and His work, a new temple is being built up in us. (1 Corinthians 3:16)

    3. The temple was constructed in a way to keep people out. But now because of the work of Christ, all people are invited in, and those who call upon His name are "grafted in". (Eph 2:15,19)

    4. We were once separated from God by our sin, but now in Christ the curtain has been torn in two and a new and living way has opened up to us. (Hebrews 10:19-20)

    5. Jesus is the fulfillment of the vision of Ezekiel who saw a new spiritual temple out of which rivers of living water would flow. (Ezekiel 47:1; John 7:37-38)


    So when we think of Jesus trip to Jerusalem and His subsequent visit to the temple in light of what we now know about His redemptive work within the context of hundreds of years of sacrifices at the temple; and we see now that all of that pointed to the day when the unblemished Lamb of God would be slain and the temple work would be fulfilled, it becomes more clear to us now that Jesus was making a very specific and important statement by walking into Jerusalem and going straight to the temple.

    Jesus was not just throwing a temper tantrum. He was making the point that He is the new and better temple!

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